Integrative Molecular Phenotyping
INTEGRATIVE MOLECULAR
PHENOTYPING
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY

PubMed

PubMed
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=metabolomics
Updated: 2 hours 45 min ago

Artificial light at night interacts with predatory threat to alter reef fish metabolite profiles.

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 14:35
Related Articles Artificial light at night interacts with predatory threat to alter reef fish metabolite profiles. Sci Total Environ. 2021 Jan 05;769:144482 Authors: Hillyer KE, Beale DJ, Shima JS Abstract Light cycles and predatory threat define activity patterns (e.g. feeding/sleeping, activity/rest) in most diurnal fish species. Artificial light at night (ALAN) may disrupt natural cycles and biochemical processes, a mismatch which can eventually reduce condition and fitness. We evaluate the separate and joint effects of ALAN and predator threat on metabolism within brain, liver and muscle tissue of a common, wild caught damselfish, blue green chromis (Chromis viridis). The effects of ALAN varied according to tissue type and predator exposure. In all tissues we observed changes in metabolic pathways associated with increased activity under continuous light (despite provision of shelter), specifically those associated with energy metabolism, cell signalling, responses to oxidative stress and markers of cellular damage. In both the brain and liver tissues, predator threat served to moderate the influence of ALAN on metabolic change, likely due to increased sheltering behaviour. However, no interaction of predator threat with ALAN was observed in metabolism of the muscle tissue. Our results highlight complex sub-acute effects of ALAN exposure on tissue specific and whole organism energy metabolism. Collectively these effects indicate that ALAN has significant scope to reduce fitness of coastal fishes and potentially threaten ecosystem services, but that these changes are highly complex and may be altered by biotic drivers of activity. PMID: 33477042 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Uncovering the antitumor effects and mechanisms of Shikonin against colon cancer on comprehensive analysis.

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 14:35
Related Articles Uncovering the antitumor effects and mechanisms of Shikonin against colon cancer on comprehensive analysis. Phytomedicine. 2021 Jan 08;82:153460 Authors: Chen Y, Si L, Zhang J, Yu H, Liu X, Chen Y, Wu Y Abstract BACKGROUND: Shikonin, a naphthoquinone compound extracted from the root of Lithospermum erythrorhizon, has been extensively studied for its antitumor activity. However, the systematic pathways involved in Shikonin intervention in human colon cancer has not yet clearly defined. PURPOSE: This study was to evaluate the cytotoxic effects of Shikonin in colon cancer, as well as investigate the potential biomarkers from a global perspective and the possible antitumor mechanisms involved. METHODS: In this work, cell viability, cell cycle and cell apoptosis in human colon cancer cells were assessed to evaluate the antitumor activity of Shikonin. Transcriptomics and metabolomics were integrated to provide the perturbed pathways and explore the potential mechanisms. The crucial proteins and genes involved were further validated by immunohistochemistry and real-time quantitative PCR. RESULTS: Shikonin revealed a remarkable antitumor potency in colon cancer. Cell cycle was significantly arrested at the S phase as well as apoptosis was induced in SW480 cell line. Furthermore, a total of 1642 differentially expressed genes and 40 metabolites were detected after Shikonin intervention. The integrated analysis suggested that the antitumor effect was mainly attributed to purine metabolism, arginine biosynthesis, pyrimidine metabolism, urea cycle and metabolism of amino acids. The up-regulated expression of proteins vital for arginine biosynthesis was subsequently validated by immunohistochemistry in xenograft mice. Notably, supplemental dNTPs and arginine could significantly reverse the cytotoxic effect induced by Shikonin and the genes participating in purine metabolism and arginine biosynthesis were further determined by RT-qPCR. CONCLUSION: Our findings provide a systematic perspective in the therapeutic effect of Shikonin which might lay a foundation for further research on Shikonin in colon cancer. PMID: 33476976 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Rosmarinic acid attenuates obesity and obesity-related inflammation in human adipocytes.

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 14:35
Related Articles Rosmarinic acid attenuates obesity and obesity-related inflammation in human adipocytes. Food Chem Toxicol. 2021 Jan 18;:112002 Authors: Vasileva LV, Savova MS, Tews D, Wabitsch M, Georgiev MI Abstract Chronic low-grade inflammation is a hallmark of obesity and its related metabolic disorders. At the same time signaling from pro-inflammatory factors such as transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) or interleukin 17A (IL-17A) are proposed as crucial for the commitment of fibroblast progenitor cells towards adipogenic differentiation. Modulation of inflammation during adipogenic differentiation is incompletely explored as a potential approach to prevent metabolic disorders. Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a caffeic acid derivative known for its anti-inflammatory effects. Experimental studies of its activity on adipogenic factors or in vivo obesity models are, however, controversial and hence insufficient. Here, we investigated the anti-adipogenic action of RA in human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) adipocytes. Gene expression levels of key players in adipogenesis and lipid metabolism were assessed. Furthermore, a molecular mechanism of action was proposed. The most prominent effect was found on the translation of C/EBPα, PPARγ and adiponectin, as well as on the modulation of TGF1B and IL17A. Interestingly, involvement of NRF2 signaling was identified upon RA treatment. In summary, our findings indicate that RA prevents inflammation and excessive lipid accumulation in human adipocytes. Data from the molecular analysis demonstrates that RA has potential for treatment of obesity and obesity-related inflammation. PMID: 33476690 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Plasma metabolomics of presymptomatic PSEN1-H163Y mutation carriers: a pilot study.

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 14:35
Related Articles Plasma metabolomics of presymptomatic PSEN1-H163Y mutation carriers: a pilot study. Ann Clin Transl Neurol. 2021 Jan 21;: Authors: Natarajan K, Ullgren A, Khoshnood B, Johansson C, Laffita-Mesa JM, Pannee J, Zetterberg H, Blennow K, Graff C Abstract BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: PSEN1-H163Y carriers, at the presymptomatic stage, have reduced 18 FDG-PET binding in the cerebrum of the brain (Scholl et al., Neurobiol Aging 32:1388-1399, 2011). This could imply dysfunctional energy metabolism in the brain. In this study, plasma of presymptomatic PSEN1 mutation carriers was analyzed to understand associated metabolic changes. METHODS: We analyzed plasma from noncarriers (NC, n = 8) and presymptomatic PSEN1-H163Y mutation carriers (MC, n = 6) via untargeted metabolomics using gas and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry, which identified 1199 metabolites. All the metabolites were compared between MC and NC using univariate analysis, as well as correlated with the ratio of Aβ1-42/A β 1-40 , using Spearman's correlation. Altered metabolites were subjected to Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). RESULTS: Based on principal component analysis the plasma metabolite profiles were divided into dataset A and dataset B. In dataset A, when comparing between presymptomatic MC and NC, the levels of 79 different metabolites were altered. Out of 79, only 14 were annotated metabolites. In dataset B, 37 metabolites were significantly altered between presymptomatic MC and NC and nine metabolites were annotated. In both datasets, annotated metabolites represent amino acids, fatty acyls, bile acids, hexoses, purine nucleosides, carboxylic acids, and glycerophosphatidylcholine species. 1-docosapentaenoyl-GPC was positively correlated, uric acid and glucose were negatively correlated with the ratio of plasma Aβ1-42 /Aβ1-40 (P < 0.05). INTERPRETATION: This study finds dysregulated metabolite classes, which are changed before the disease symptom onset. Also, it provides an opportunity to compare with sporadic Alzheimer's Disease. Observed findings in this study need to be validated in a larger and independent Familial Alzheimer's Disease (FAD) cohort. PMID: 33476461 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Blood plasma metabolomics of children and adolescents with sickle cell anaemia treated with hydroxycarbamide: a new tool for uncovering biochemical alterations.

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 14:35
Related Articles Blood plasma metabolomics of children and adolescents with sickle cell anaemia treated with hydroxycarbamide: a new tool for uncovering biochemical alterations. Br J Haematol. 2021 Jan 21;: Authors: Ribeiro PR, Teixeira RDS, Souza AR, Pereira TCS, Boffo EF, Carosio MGA, Ferreira AG, Oliveira RV, Rodrigues LEA, Silva JJ, de Souza AJ, Ladeia AMT Abstract Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is a debilitating genetic haemoglobinopathy predominantly affecting the disenfranchised strata of society in Africa and the Americas. The most common pharmacological treatment for this disease is the administration of hydroxycarbamide (HC) for which questions remain regarding its mechanism of action, efficacy and long-term toxicity specifically in paediatric individuals. A multiplatform metabolomics approach was used to assess the metabolome of plasma samples from a population of children and adolescents with SCA with and without HC treatment along with non-SCA individuals. Fifty-three metabolites were identified by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS) and 1 H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) with a predominance of membrane lipids, amino acids and organic acids. The partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) analysis allowed a clear discrimination between the different studied groups, revealing clear effects of the HC treatment in the patients' metabolome including rescue of specific metabolites to control levels. Increased creatine/creatinine levels under HC treatment suggests a possible increase in the arginine pool and increased NO synthesis, supporting existing models for HC action in SCA. The metabolomics results extend the current knowledge on the models for SCA pathophysiology including impairment of Lands' cycle and increased synthesis of sphingosine 1-phosphate. Putative novel biomarkers are suggested. PMID: 33476407 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Microalgal-bacterial consortia unveil distinct physiological changes to facilitate growth of microalgae.

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 14:35
Related Articles Microalgal-bacterial consortia unveil distinct physiological changes to facilitate growth of microalgae. FEMS Microbiol Ecol. 2021 Jan 21;: Authors: Perera IA, Abinandan S, Subashchandrabose SR, Venkateswarlu K, Naidu R, Megharaj M Abstract Physiological changes that drive the microalgal-bacterial consortia are poorly understood so far. In the present novel study, we initially assessed five morphologically distinct microalgae for their ability in establishing consortia in Bold's basal medium with a bacterial strain, Variovorax paradoxus IS1, all isolated from wastewaters. Tetradesmus obliquus IS2 and Coelastrella sp. IS3 were further selected for gaining insights into physiological changes including those of metabolomes in consortia involving V. paradoxus IS1. The distinct parameters investigated were pigments (chlorophyll a, b, and carotenoids), reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipids, and metabolites that are implicated in major metabolic pathways. There was a significant increase (>1.2-fold) in pigments, viz., chlorophyll a, b and carotenoids, decrease in ROS, and enhanced lipid yield (>2-fold) in consortia than in individual cultures. In addition, the differential regulation of cellular metabolites such as sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and phytohormones was distinct among the two microalgal-bacterial consortia. Our results thus indicate that the selected microalgal strains, T. obliquus IS2 and Coelastrella sp. IS3, developed efficient consortia with V. paradoxus IS1 by effecting the required physiological changes including metabolomics. Such microalgal-bacterial consortia could largely be used in wastewater treatment and for production of value-added metabolites. PMID: 33476378 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

LC-MS based plasma metabolomics study of the intervention effect of different polar parts of Hawthorn on gastrointestinal motility disorder rats.

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 14:35
Related Articles LC-MS based plasma metabolomics study of the intervention effect of different polar parts of Hawthorn on gastrointestinal motility disorder rats. Biomed Chromatogr. 2021 Jan 21;:e5076 Authors: Wang K, Luo L, Xu X, Chen X, He Q, Zou Z, Wang S, Liang S Abstract Dyspepsia, one of the most prevalent diseases of the digestive tract that impacts the quality of patient life, is mainly caused by gastrointestinal motility disorder. Hawthorn is a commonly-used traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for treating dyspepsia, has been proven to improve gastrointestinal motility. Herein, a rat model of gastrointestinal motility disorder was established by subcutaneous injecting with atropine. The modeled rats were treated with 4 polar parts (T1-4 in descending polarity, corresponding to water, n-butanol, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether extracts, respectively) of hawthorn. Through metabolomics analysis, a total of 20 significantly metabolites were identified with significant changes in their abundance levels and these metabolites were related to many metabolic pathways such as amino acid metabolism and primary bile acid biosynthesis. The results showed that T3 had the best therapeutic effect of promoting gastrointestinal motility, other parts with no obvious therapeutic effect, demonstrating that the effective components of hawthorn may be compounds of medium polarity. T3 might achieve good therapeutic effects due to the gastrointestinal motility promotion activity, and by rectifying the disturbed metabolic pathways in gastrointestinal motility disorder model. PMID: 33476053 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Lipidomic Analysis of Postmortem Prefrontal Cortex Phospholipids Reveals Changes in Choline Plasmalogen Containing Docosahexaenoic Acid and Stearic Acid Between Cases With and Without Alzheimer's Disease.

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 14:35
Related Articles Lipidomic Analysis of Postmortem Prefrontal Cortex Phospholipids Reveals Changes in Choline Plasmalogen Containing Docosahexaenoic Acid and Stearic Acid Between Cases With and Without Alzheimer's Disease. Neuromolecular Med. 2021 Jan 21;: Authors: Otoki Y, Kato S, Nakagawa K, Harvey DJ, Jin LW, Dugger BN, Taha AY Abstract Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and incurable brain disorder that has been associated with structural changes in brain phospholipids (PLs), including diacyl species and ether-linked PLs known as plasmalogens. Most studies have characterized total changes in brain PL pools (e.g., choline plasmalogens), particularly in prefrontal cortex, but detailed and quantitative information on the molecular PL species impacted by the disease is limited. In this study, we used a comprehensive mass-spectrometry method to quantify diacyl and plasmalogen species, alkyl synthetic precursors of plasmalogens, and lysophospholipid degradation products of diacyl and plasmalogen PLs, in postmortem samples of prefrontal cortex from 21 AD patients and 20 age-matched controls. Total PLs were also quantified with gas-chromatography analysis of bound fatty acids following thin layer chromatography isolation. There was a significant 27% reduction in the concentration (nmol/g wet weight) of choline plasmalogen containing stearic acid (alkenyl group) and docosahexaenoic acid in AD compared to controls. Stearic acid concentration in total PLs was reduced by 26%. Our findings suggest specific changes in PLs containing stearic acid and docosahexaenoic acid in AD prefrontal cortex, highlighting structural and turnover PL pathways that could be targeted. PMID: 33475971 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Global metabolomic analysis of blood from mice infected with Brucella abortus.

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 14:35
Related Articles Global metabolomic analysis of blood from mice infected with Brucella abortus. J Vet Med Sci. 2021 Jan 19;: Authors: Vu SH, Kim B, Reyes AWB, Huy TXN, Lee JH, Kim S, Kim HJ Abstract To better understanding Brucella abortus infection, serum metabolites of B. abortus -infected and -uninfected mice were analyzed and twenty-one metabolites were tentatively identified at 3 and 14 days post-infection (d.p.i.). Level of most lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) was found to increase in infected mice at 3 d.p.i., while it was decreased at 14 d.p.i. as compared to uninfected mice. In contrast, acylcarnitines were initially reduced at 3 d.p.i then elevated after two-weeks of infection, while hydroxysanthine was increased at 14 d.p.i. in infected mice. Our findings suggest that the significant changes in LPCs and other identified metabolites may serve as potential biomarkers in acute phase of B. abortus infection. PMID: 33473061 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

The complexities of the diet-microbiome relationship: advances and perspectives.

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 14:35
Related Articles The complexities of the diet-microbiome relationship: advances and perspectives. Genome Med. 2021 Jan 20;13(1):10 Authors: Leeming ER, Louca P, Gibson R, Menni C, Spector TD, Le Roy CI Abstract Personalised dietary modulation of the gut microbiota may be key to disease management. Current investigations provide a broad understanding of the impact of diet on the composition and activity of the gut microbiota, yet detailed knowledge in applying diet as an actionable tool remains limited. Further to the relative novelty of the field, approaches are yet to be standardised and extremely heterogeneous research outcomes have ensued. This may be related to confounders associated with complexities in capturing an accurate representation of both diet and the gut microbiota. This review discusses the intricacies and current methodologies of diet-microbial relations, the implications and limitations of these investigative approaches, and future considerations that may assist in accelerating applications. New investigations should consider improved collection of dietary data, further characterisation of mechanistic interactions, and an increased focus on -omic technologies such as metabolomics to describe the bacterial and metabolic activity of food degradation, together with its crosstalk with the host. Furthermore, clinical evidence with health outcomes is required before therapeutic dietary strategies for microbial amelioration can be made. The potential to reach detailed understanding of diet-microbiota relations may depend on re-evaluation, progression, and unification of research methodologies, which consider the complexities of these interactions. PMID: 33472701 [PubMed - in process]

Exploring plant metabolic genomics: chemical diversity, metabolic complexity in the biosynthesis and transport of specialized metabolites with the tea plant as a model.

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 14:35
Related Articles Exploring plant metabolic genomics: chemical diversity, metabolic complexity in the biosynthesis and transport of specialized metabolites with the tea plant as a model. Crit Rev Biotechnol. 2020 Aug;40(5):667-688 Authors: Zhao J, Li P, Xia T, Wan X Abstract The diversity and complexity of secondary metabolites in tea plants contribute substantially to the popularity of tea, by determining tea flavors and their numerous health benefits. The most significant characteristics of tea plants are that they concentrate the complex plant secondary metabolites into one leaf: flavonoids, alkaloids, theanine, volatiles, and saponins. Many fundamental questions regarding tea plant secondary metabolism remain unanswered. This includes how tea plants accumulate high levels of monomeric galloylated catechins, unlike the polymerized flavan-3-ols in most other plants, as well as how they are evolved to selectively synthesize theanine and caffeine, and how tea plants properly transport and store these cytotoxic products and then reuse them in defense. Tea plants coordinate many metabolic pathways that simultaneously take place in young tea leaves in response to both developmental and environmental cues. With the available genome sequences of tea plants and high-throughput metabolomic tools as great platforms, it is of particular interest to launch metabolic genomics studies using tea plants as a model system. Plant metabolic genomics are to investigate all aspects of plant secondary metabolism at the genetic, genome, and molecular levels. This includes plant domestication and adaptation, divergence and convergence of secondary metaboloic pathways. The biosynthesis, transport, storage, and transcriptional regulation mechanisms of all metabolites are of core interest in the plant as a whole. This review highlights relevant contexts of metabolic genomics, outstanding questions, and strategies for answering them, with aim to guide future research for genetic improvement of nutrition quality for healthier plant foods. PMID: 32321331 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Global, Regional, and National Cancer Incidence, Mortality, Years of Life Lost, Years Lived With Disability, and Disability-Adjusted Life-Years for 29 Cancer Groups, 1990 to 2017: A Systematic Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study.

Fri, 22/01/2021 - 14:35
Related Articles Global, Regional, and National Cancer Incidence, Mortality, Years of Life Lost, Years Lived With Disability, and Disability-Adjusted Life-Years for 29 Cancer Groups, 1990 to 2017: A Systematic Analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study. JAMA Oncol. 2019 12 01;5(12):1749-1768 Authors: Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration, Fitzmaurice C, Abate D, Abbasi N, Abbastabar H, Abd-Allah F, Abdel-Rahman O, Abdelalim A, Abdoli A, Abdollahpour I, Abdulle ASM, Abebe ND, Abraha HN, Abu-Raddad LJ, Abualhasan A, Adedeji IA, Advani SM, Afarideh M, Afshari M, Aghaali M, Agius D, Agrawal S, Ahmadi A, Ahmadian E, Ahmadpour E, Ahmed MB, Akbari ME, Akinyemiju T, Al-Aly Z, AlAbdulKader AM, Alahdab F, Alam T, Alamene GM, Alemnew BTT, Alene KA, Alinia C, Alipour V, Aljunid SM, Bakeshei FA, Almadi MAH, Almasi-Hashiani A, Alsharif U, Alsowaidi S, Alvis-Guzman N, Amini E, Amini S, Amoako YA, Anbari Z, Anber NH, Andrei CL, Anjomshoa M, Ansari F, Ansariadi A, Appiah SCY, Arab-Zozani M, Arabloo J, Arefi Z, Aremu O, Areri HA, Artaman A, Asayesh H, Asfaw ET, Ashagre AF, Assadi R, Ataeinia B, Atalay HT, Ataro Z, Atique S, Ausloos M, Avila-Burgos L, Avokpaho EFGA, Awasthi A, Awoke N, Ayala Quintanilla BP, Ayanore MA, Ayele HT, Babaee E, Bacha U, Badawi A, Bagherzadeh M, Bagli E, Balakrishnan S, Balouchi A, Bärnighausen TW, Battista RJ, Behzadifar M, Behzadifar M, Bekele BB, Belay YB, Belayneh YM, Berfield KKS, Berhane A, Bernabe E, Beuran M, Bhakta N, Bhattacharyya K, Biadgo B, Bijani A, Bin Sayeed MS, Birungi C, Bisignano C, Bitew H, Bjørge T, Bleyer A, Bogale KA, Bojia HA, Borzì AM, Bosetti C, Bou-Orm IR, Brenner H, Brewer JD, Briko AN, Briko NI, Bustamante-Teixeira MT, Butt ZA, Carreras G, Carrero JJ, Carvalho F, Castro C, Castro F, Catalá-López F, Cerin E, Chaiah Y, Chanie WF, Chattu VK, Chaturvedi P, Chauhan NS, Chehrazi M, Chiang PP, Chichiabellu TY, Chido-Amajuoyi OG, Chimed-Ochir O, Choi JJ, Christopher DJ, Chu DT, Constantin MM, Costa VM, Crocetti E, Crowe CS, Curado MP, Dahlawi SMA, Damiani G, Darwish AH, Daryani A, das Neves J, Demeke FM, Demis AB, Demissie BW, Demoz GT, Denova-Gutiérrez E, Derakhshani A, Deribe KS, Desai R, Desalegn BB, Desta M, Dey S, Dharmaratne SD, Dhimal M, Diaz D, Dinberu MTT, Djalalinia S, Doku DT, Drake TM, Dubey M, Dubljanin E, Duken EE, Ebrahimi H, Effiong A, Eftekhari A, El Sayed I, Zaki MES, El-Jaafary SI, El-Khatib Z, Elemineh DA, Elkout H, Ellenbogen RG, Elsharkawy A, Emamian MH, Endalew DA, Endries AY, Eshrati B, Fadhil I, Fallah Omrani V, Faramarzi M, Farhangi MA, Farioli A, Farzadfar F, Fentahun N, Fernandes E, Feyissa GT, Filip I, Fischer F, Fisher JL, Force LM, Foroutan M, Freitas M, Fukumoto T, Futran ND, Gallus S, Gankpe FG, Gayesa RT, Gebrehiwot TT, Gebremeskel GG, Gedefaw GA, Gelaw BK, Geta B, Getachew S, Gezae KE, Ghafourifard M, Ghajar A, Ghashghaee A, Gholamian A, Gill PS, Ginindza TTG, Girmay A, Gizaw M, Gomez RS, Gopalani SV, Gorini G, Goulart BNG, Grada A, Ribeiro Guerra M, Guimaraes ALS, Gupta PC, Gupta R, Hadkhale K, Haj-Mirzaian A, Haj-Mirzaian A, Hamadeh RR, Hamidi S, Hanfore LK, Haro JM, Hasankhani M, Hasanzadeh A, Hassen HY, Hay RJ, Hay SI, Henok A, Henry NJ, Herteliu C, Hidru HD, Hoang CL, Hole MK, Hoogar P, Horita N, Hosgood HD, Hosseini M, Hosseinzadeh M, Hostiuc M, Hostiuc S, Househ M, Hussen MM, Ileanu B, Ilic MD, Innos K, Irvani SSN, Iseh KR, Islam SMS, Islami F, Jafari Balalami N, Jafarinia M, Jahangiry L, Jahani MA, Jahanmehr N, Jakovljevic M, James SL, Javanbakht M, Jayaraman S, Jee SH, Jenabi E, Jha RP, Jonas JB, Jonnagaddala J, Joo T, Jungari SB, Jürisson M, Kabir A, Kamangar F, Karch A, Karimi N, Karimian A, Kasaeian A, Kasahun GG, Kassa B, Kassa TD, Kassaw MW, Kaul A, Keiyoro PN, Kelbore AG, Kerbo AA, Khader YS, Khalilarjmandi M, Khan EA, Khan G, Khang YH, Khatab K, Khater A, Khayamzadeh M, Khazaee-Pool M, Khazaei S, Khoja AT, Khosravi MH, Khubchandani J, Kianipour N, Kim D, Kim YJ, Kisa A, Kisa S, Kissimova-Skarbek K, Komaki H, Koyanagi A, Krohn KJ, Bicer BK, Kugbey N, Kumar V, Kuupiel D, La Vecchia C, Lad DP, Lake EA, Lakew AM, Lal DK, Lami FH, Lan Q, Lasrado S, Lauriola P, Lazarus JV, Leigh J, Leshargie CT, Liao Y, Limenih MA, Listl S, Lopez AD, Lopukhov PD, Lunevicius R, Madadin M, Magdeldin S, El Razek HMA, Majeed A, Maleki A, Malekzadeh R, Manafi A, Manafi N, Manamo WA, Mansourian M, Mansournia MA, Mantovani LG, Maroufizadeh S, Martini SMS, Mashamba-Thompson TP, Massenburg BB, Maswabi MT, Mathur MR, McAlinden C, McKee M, Meheretu HAA, Mehrotra R, Mehta V, Meier T, Melaku YA, Meles GG, Meles HG, Melese A, Melku M, Memiah PTN, Mendoza W, Menezes RG, Merat S, Meretoja TJ, Mestrovic T, Miazgowski B, Miazgowski T, Mihretie KMM, Miller TR, Mills EJ, Mir SM, Mirzaei H, Mirzaei HR, Mishra R, Moazen B, Mohammad DK, Mohammad KA, Mohammad Y, Darwesh AM, Mohammadbeigi A, Mohammadi H, Mohammadi M, Mohammadian M, Mohammadian-Hafshejani A, Mohammadoo-Khorasani M, Mohammadpourhodki R, Mohammed AS, Mohammed JA, Mohammed S, Mohebi F, Mokdad AH, Monasta L, Moodley Y, Moosazadeh M, Moossavi M, Moradi G, Moradi-Joo M, Moradi-Lakeh M, Moradpour F, Morawska L, Morgado-da-Costa J, Morisaki N, Morrison SD, Mosapour A, Mousavi SM, Muche AA, Muhammed OSS, Musa J, Nabhan AF, Naderi M, Nagarajan AJ, Nagel G, Nahvijou A, Naik G, Najafi F, Naldi L, Nam HS, Nasiri N, Nazari J, Negoi I, Neupane S, Newcomb PA, Nggada HA, Ngunjiri JW, Nguyen CT, Nikniaz L, Ningrum DNA, Nirayo YL, Nixon MR, Nnaji CA, Nojomi M, Nosratnejad S, Shiadeh MN, Obsa MS, Ofori-Asenso R, Ogbo FA, Oh IH, Olagunju AT, Olagunju TO, Oluwasanu MM, Omonisi AE, Onwujekwe OE, Oommen AM, Oren E, Ortega-Altamirano DDV, Ota E, Otstavnov SS, Owolabi MO, P A M, Padubidri JR, Pakhale S, Pakpour AH, Pana A, Park EK, Parsian H, Pashaei T, Patel S, Patil ST, Pennini A, Pereira DM, Piccinelli C, Pillay JD, Pirestani M, Pishgar F, Postma MJ, Pourjafar H, Pourmalek F, Pourshams A, Prakash S, Prasad N, Qorbani M, Rabiee M, Rabiee N, Radfar A, Rafiei A, Rahim F, Rahimi M, Rahman MA, Rajati F, Rana SM, Raoofi S, Rath GK, Rawaf DL, Rawaf S, Reiner RC, Renzaho AMN, Rezaei N, Rezapour A, Ribeiro AI, Ribeiro D, Ronfani L, Roro EM, Roshandel G, Rostami A, Saad RS, Sabbagh P, Sabour S, Saddik B, Safiri S, Sahebkar A, Salahshoor MR, Salehi F, Salem H, Salem MR, Salimzadeh H, Salomon JA, Samy AM, Sanabria J, Santric Milicevic MM, Sartorius B, Sarveazad A, Sathian B, Satpathy M, Savic M, Sawhney M, Sayyah M, Schneider IJC, Schöttker B, Sekerija M, Sepanlou SG, Sepehrimanesh M, Seyedmousavi S, Shaahmadi F, Shabaninejad H, Shahbaz M, Shaikh MA, Shamshirian A, Shamsizadeh M, Sharafi H, Sharafi Z, Sharif M, Sharifi A, Sharifi H, Sharma R, Sheikh A, Shirkoohi R, Shukla SR, Si S, Siabani S, Silva DAS, Silveira DGA, Singh A, Singh JA, Sisay S, Sitas F, Sobngwi E, Soofi M, Soriano JB, Stathopoulou V, Sufiyan MB, Tabarés-Seisdedos R, Tabuchi T, Takahashi K, Tamtaji OR, Tarawneh MR, Tassew SG, Taymoori P, Tehrani-Banihashemi A, Temsah MH, Temsah O, Tesfay BE, Tesfay FH, Teshale MY, Tessema GA, Thapa S, Tlaye KG, Topor-Madry R, Tovani-Palone MR, Traini E, Tran BX, Tran KB, Tsadik AG, Ullah I, Uthman OA, Vacante M, Vaezi M, Varona Pérez P, Veisani Y, Vidale S, Violante FS, Vlassov V, Vollset SE, Vos T, Vosoughi K, Vu GT, Vujcic IS, Wabinga H, Wachamo TM, Wagnew FS, Waheed Y, Weldegebreal F, Weldesamuel GT, Wijeratne T, Wondafrash DZ, Wonde TE, Wondmieneh AB, Workie HM, Yadav R, Yadegar A, Yadollahpour A, Yaseri M, Yazdi-Feyzabadi V, Yeshaneh A, Yimam MA, Yimer EM, Yisma E, Yonemoto N, Younis MZ, Yousefi B, Yousefifard M, Yu C, Zabeh E, Zadnik V, Moghadam TZ, Zaidi Z, Zamani M, Zandian H, Zangeneh A, Zaki L, Zendehdel K, Zenebe ZM, Zewale TA, Ziapour A, Zodpey S, Murray CJL Abstract Importance: Cancer and other noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are now widely recognized as a threat to global development. The latest United Nations high-level meeting on NCDs reaffirmed this observation and also highlighted the slow progress in meeting the 2011 Political Declaration on the Prevention and Control of Noncommunicable Diseases and the third Sustainable Development Goal. Lack of situational analyses, priority setting, and budgeting have been identified as major obstacles in achieving these goals. All of these have in common that they require information on the local cancer epidemiology. The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study is uniquely poised to provide these crucial data. Objective: To describe cancer burden for 29 cancer groups in 195 countries from 1990 through 2017 to provide data needed for cancer control planning. Evidence Review: We used the GBD study estimation methods to describe cancer incidence, mortality, years lived with disability, years of life lost, and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs). Results are presented at the national level as well as by Socio-demographic Index (SDI), a composite indicator of income, educational attainment, and total fertility rate. We also analyzed the influence of the epidemiological vs the demographic transition on cancer incidence. Findings: In 2017, there were 24.5 million incident cancer cases worldwide (16.8 million without nonmelanoma skin cancer [NMSC]) and 9.6 million cancer deaths. The majority of cancer DALYs came from years of life lost (97%), and only 3% came from years lived with disability. The odds of developing cancer were the lowest in the low SDI quintile (1 in 7) and the highest in the high SDI quintile (1 in 2) for both sexes. In 2017, the most common incident cancers in men were NMSC (4.3 million incident cases); tracheal, bronchus, and lung (TBL) cancer (1.5 million incident cases); and prostate cancer (1.3 million incident cases). The most common causes of cancer deaths and DALYs for men were TBL cancer (1.3 million deaths and 28.4 million DALYs), liver cancer (572 000 deaths and 15.2 million DALYs), and stomach cancer (542 000 deaths and 12.2 million DALYs). For women in 2017, the most common incident cancers were NMSC (3.3 million incident cases), breast cancer (1.9 million incident cases), and colorectal cancer (819 000 incident cases). The leading causes of cancer deaths and DALYs for women were breast cancer (601 000 deaths and 17.4 million DALYs), TBL cancer (596 000 deaths and 12.6 million DALYs), and colorectal cancer (414 000 deaths and 8.3 million DALYs). Conclusions and Relevance: The national epidemiological profiles of cancer burden in the GBD study show large heterogeneities, which are a reflection of different exposures to risk factors, economic settings, lifestyles, and access to care and screening. The GBD study can be used by policy makers and other stakeholders to develop and improve national and local cancer control in order to achieve the global targets and improve equity in cancer care. PMID: 31560378 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

metabolomics; +26 new citations

Thu, 21/01/2021 - 14:28
26 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2021/01/21PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +34 new citations

Wed, 20/01/2021 - 14:21
34 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2021/01/20PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +28 new citations

Wed, 20/01/2021 - 11:18
28 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2021/01/20PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +20 new citations

Sun, 17/01/2021 - 13:59
20 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2021/01/17PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +21 new citations

Sat, 16/01/2021 - 13:55
21 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2021/01/16PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +20 new citations

Fri, 15/01/2021 - 13:48
20 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2021/01/15PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +36 new citations

Thu, 14/01/2021 - 13:43
36 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2021/01/14PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +34 new citations

Wed, 13/01/2021 - 13:36
34 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2021/01/13PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Pages