Integrative Molecular Phenotyping
INTEGRATIVE MOLECULAR
PHENOTYPING
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY

PubMed

PubMed
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=metabolomics
Updated: 1 hour 55 min ago

Metabolic effects of repeated ketamine administration in the rat brain.

Mon, 02/12/2019 - 14:33
Related Articles Metabolic effects of repeated ketamine administration in the rat brain. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. 2019 Nov 27;: Authors: Chen F, Ye Y, Dai X, Zheng Y, Fang S, Liao L Abstract Ketamine is a popular recreational drug used in club and dance music settings. Evidence suggests that chronic or repeated ketamine use could induce neurological and psychological harm, while the mechanisms underlying ketamine's effects on the nervous system are still unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the metabolic changes that occur in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), hippocampus (Hip) and striatum of rats with repeated ketamine exposure and withdrawal intervention and to identify the potential metabolic pathways influenced by ketamine. An untargeted ultra-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS)-based metabolomics method coupled with multivariate and univariate statistical analysis was applied to analyze the metabolic profiles of the PFC, Hip, and striatum and to identify metabolite alterations. The pathway analysis tool in MetaboAnalyst was subsequently applied for pathway predictions. A total of 79, 54 and 58 changed metabolites were identified in the PFC, Hip and striatum, respectively, after repeated ketamine exposure. Pathway analysis indicated that purine metabolism and glycerophospholipid metabolism were the main pathways disturbed by ketamine in all three brain regions. After one week of withdrawal intervention, most changed metabolites in the Hip and striatum had been restored to control levels, while the metabolite alterations in the PFC were persistent. These results revealed that repeated ketamine exposure significantly changed purine metabolism and glycerophospholipid metabolism in the PFC, Hip and striatum, which might be involved in the neurotoxic effects of ketamine. Additionally, this study also identified that the PFC, rather than the Hip or striatum, was more likely to be the target region of the long-term effects of ketamine. PMID: 31785818 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Tween 80 induces a carbon flux rerouting in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Sun, 01/12/2019 - 14:25
Related Articles Tween 80 induces a carbon flux rerouting in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. J Microbiol Methods. 2019 Nov 27;:105795 Authors: Pietersen RD, du Preez I, Loots DT, van Reenen M, Beukes D, Leisching G, Baker B Abstract As a means to increase the growth rate and reduce aggregation, Tween 80 is routinely added to growth media during mycobacterial culturing. This detergent has, however, been associated with causing alterations to the morphology, pathogenicity and virulence of these bacteria. In an attempt to better understand the underlying mechanism of these alterations, we investigated the effect of Tween 80 on the metabolomes of a M. tuberculosis lab strain (H37Rv) and multidrug-resistant clinical strain (R179), using GC-GCxTOF-MS metabolomics. The metabolite markers identified indicated Tween 80-induced disparities in the central carbon metabolism of both strains, with an upregulation in the glyoxylate cycle, glucogenogenesis and the pentose phosphate pathway. The results also signified an increased production of mycobacterial biosynthetic precursors such as triacylglycerols, proteinogenic amino acids and nucleotide precursors, in the presence of the detergent. Collectively, these metabolome variations mimic the phenotypic changes observed when M. tuberculosis is grown in vivo, in a lipid rich environment. However, in addition to the increased availability of oleic acid as a carbon source from Tween 80, the observed variations, and the morphological changes associated with the detergent, could also be a result of an overall stress response in these bacteria. This study is the first to identify specific metabolome variations related to the addition of Tween 80 to the growth media during M. tuberculosis culturing. The consideration of these results during the method development and data interpretation phases of future metabolomics investigations will improve the quality of the analyses as well as the credibility of potential research outcomes. These results will also assist in the interpretation of research questions specifically aimed at aspects of mycobacterial metabolism, even when using other methodologies such as transcriptomics or fluxomics. PMID: 31785333 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Study of Differential Serum Metabolites in Patients with Adenomatous Polyps of Colon and Yang-Deficiency Constitution Based on Ultra-performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

Sun, 01/12/2019 - 14:25
Related Articles Study of Differential Serum Metabolites in Patients with Adenomatous Polyps of Colon and Yang-Deficiency Constitution Based on Ultra-performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. Chin J Integr Med. 2019 Nov 29;: Authors: Du WZ, Zhang AH, Ren JL, Lyu K, Tuo LY, Xu W Abstract OBJECTIVE: To study the differences between the serum metabolites in patients with adenomatous polyps of the colon and yang-deficiency constitution and those without colon polyps and with balanced constitution, and look for biomarkers that can be used to distinguish between the two groups. METHODS: General patient information was gathered, and Chinese medicine constitution were collected in 940 patients who underwent electronic colonoscopy. A total of 119 patients with adenomatous polyps of the colon and yang-deficiency constitution were included in the experimental group, and 150 patients without colon polyps and with balanced constitution were included in the control group. Metabolomics analysis was performed on the fasting venous blood obtained from each patient in both groups. Principal component analysis and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis were performed on the detection results, potential biomarkers were screened, metabolic pathway changes were determined, and the metabolic processes involved were discussed. RESULTS: A total of 59 differential biomarkers between the experimental group and the control group were identified. The differential metabolites were found mainly in the glycerophospholipid metabolism pathway, and the bile acid 3-oxo-4,6-choladienoic acid was the biomarker that distinguished the experimental group from the control group. CONCLUSION: With the help of metabolomics analysis, the differential metabolites in patients with adenomatous polyps of the colon and yang-deficiency constitution and those in patients without colon polyps and with balanced constitution could be identified. The biomarker 3-oxo-4,6-choladienoic acid may have potential diagnostic value in patients with adenomatous polyp of the colon and yang-deficiency constitution. (Trial Registration No. NCT02986308). PMID: 31784934 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Tryptophan metabolism is differently regulated between large and small dogs.

Sun, 01/12/2019 - 14:25
Related Articles Tryptophan metabolism is differently regulated between large and small dogs. Geroscience. 2019 Nov 29;: Authors: Hoffman JM, Kiklevich JV, Austad M, Tran V, Jones DP, Royal A, Henry C, Austad SN Abstract Companion dogs have recently been promoted as an animal model for the study of aging due to their similar disease profile to humans, the sophistication of health assessment and disease diagnosis, and the shared environments with their owners. In addition, dogs show an interesting life history trait pattern where smaller individuals are up to two-fold longer lived than their larger counterparts. While some of the mechanisms underlying this size and longevity trade-off are strongly suspected (i.e., growth hormone/IGF-I), there are likely a number of undiscovered mechanisms as well. Accordingly, we have completed a large-scale global metabolomic profiling of dogs encompassing a range of sizes and ages from three cities across the USA. We found a surprisingly strong location signal in the metabolome, stronger in fact than any signal related to age, breed, or sex. However, after controlling for the effects of location, tryptophan metabolism emerged as significantly associated with weight of the dogs, with small dogs having significantly higher levels of tryptophan pathway metabolites. Overall, our results point toward novel, testable hypotheses about the underlying physiological mechanisms that influence size and longevity in the companion dog and suggest that dogs may be useful in sorting out the complexities of the tryptophan metabolic network. PMID: 31784886 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Advances in molecular biology of Paeonia L.

Sun, 01/12/2019 - 14:25
Related Articles Advances in molecular biology of Paeonia L. Planta. 2019 Nov 29;251(1):23 Authors: Fan Y, Wang Q, Dong Z, Yin Y, Teixeira da Silva JA, Yu X Abstract Molecular biology can serve as a tool to solve the limitations of traditional breeding and cultivation techniques related to flower patterns, the improvement of flower color, and the regulation of flowering and stress resistance. These characteristics of molecular biology ensured its significant role in improving the efficiency of breeding and germplasm amelioration of Paeonia. This review describes the advances in molecular biology of Paeonia, including: (1) the application of molecular markers; (2) genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and microRNA studies; (3) studies of functional genes; and (4) molecular biology techniques. This review also points out select limitations in current molecular biology, analyzes the direction of Paeonia molecular biology research, and provides advice for future research objectives. PMID: 31784828 [PubMed - in process]

Type I Interferon Signaling Disrupts the Hepatic Urea Cycle and Alters Systemic Metabolism to Suppress T Cell Function.

Sun, 01/12/2019 - 14:25
Related Articles Type I Interferon Signaling Disrupts the Hepatic Urea Cycle and Alters Systemic Metabolism to Suppress T Cell Function. Immunity. 2019 Nov 22;: Authors: Lercher A, Bhattacharya A, Popa AM, Caldera M, Schlapansky MF, Baazim H, Agerer B, Gürtl B, Kosack L, Májek P, Brunner JS, Vitko D, Pinter T, Genger JW, Orlova A, Pikor N, Reil D, Ozsvár-Kozma M, Kalinke U, Ludewig B, Moriggl R, Bennett KL, Menche J, Cheng PN, Schabbauer G, Trauner M, Klavins K, Bergthaler A Abstract Infections induce complex host responses linked to antiviral defense, inflammation, and tissue damage and repair. We hypothesized that the liver, as a central metabolic hub, may orchestrate systemic metabolic changes during infection. We infected mice with chronic lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), performed RNA sequencing and proteomics of liver tissue, and integrated these data with serum metabolomics at different infection phases. Widespread reprogramming of liver metabolism occurred early after infection, correlating with type I interferon (IFN-I) responses. Viral infection induced metabolic alterations of the liver that depended on the interferon alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR1). Hepatocyte-intrinsic IFNAR1 repressed the transcription of metabolic genes, including Otc and Ass1, which encode urea cycle enzymes. This led to decreased arginine and increased ornithine concentrations in the circulation, resulting in suppressed virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses and ameliorated liver pathology. These findings establish IFN-I-induced modulation of hepatic metabolism and the urea cycle as an endogenous mechanism of immunoregulation. PMID: 31784108 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Auxin and cytokinin coordinate the dormancy and outgrowth of axillary bud in strawberry runner.

Sun, 01/12/2019 - 14:25
Related Articles Auxin and cytokinin coordinate the dormancy and outgrowth of axillary bud in strawberry runner. BMC Plant Biol. 2019 Nov 29;19(1):528 Authors: Qiu Y, Guan SC, Wen C, Li P, Gao Z, Chen X Abstract BACKGROUND: Axillary buds allow the production of either vegetative or reproductive shoots, which display a plastic developmental potential of the plant to suit the prevailing environmental changes. Strawberry represents one of many plant species which displays horizontal above-ground growth of shoot development for asexual reproduction. Two distinct runner growth patterns exist in different strawberry species: one is called sympodial type such as Fragaria vesca, and the other one is called monopodial type such as Fragaria pentaphylla. Despite the runner growth morphology of these strawberry species have been well known, the mechanisms that determine the distinct patterns have rarely been reported. RESULTS: In this study, we used Fragaria vesca Hawaii-4 and Fragaria pentaphylla as model species, and captured the initiated dormant bud and non-dormant bud as materials to compare their transcriptome profiles and phytohormone content. Comparisons revealed that relatively higher auxin activity is present in the dormant bud and relatively higher cytokinin activity is in the non-dormant bud. Decapitation and pharmacological experiments on dormant buds showed that the reduction of auxin accumulation triggers the regeneration of vegetative shoots in dormant buds, and exogenous cytokinin application triggers cell fate turnover and generation of reproductive shoots. CONCLUSION: Here, we uncover a mechanism by which auxin and cytokinin coordinate the dormancy and outgrowth of axillary bud in strawberry runner. Our results suggest a contrasting behavior of auxin and cytokinin in control of axillary bud development, facilitating a preliminary understanding of shoot architecture formation in strawberry. PMID: 31783789 [PubMed - in process]

Diet-Induced Rat Model of Gradual Development of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) with Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) Secretion.

Sun, 01/12/2019 - 14:25
Related Articles Diet-Induced Rat Model of Gradual Development of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) with Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) Secretion. Diagnostics (Basel). 2019 Nov 27;9(4): Authors: Maciejewska D, Łukomska A, Dec K, Skonieczna-Żydecka K, Gutowska I, Skórka-Majewicz M, Styburski D, Misiakiewicz-Has K, Pilutin A, Palma J, Sieletycka K, Marlicz W, Stachowska E Abstract BACKGROUND: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the most common liver disorders in industrialized Western countries. The prevalence of the disease is estimated to range from 4% to 46% worldwide. The aim of study was to develop an animal model with gradual NAFLD development. METHODS: Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a high-fat and high-cholesterol (HFHCh) diet. The rats from the study and control groups were sacrificed after 2, 4, 8, 12, 16, and 20 weeks of dietary exposure. RESULTS: Analysis of biochemical parameters showed that after only two weeks, ALT and cholesterol concentration in serum were elevated. After 4 weeks, TNF-α and HOMA-IR were significantly higher compared to the control group. NAFLD progression started after 12 weeks of diet-weight gain and increased LPS secretions were noticed. During the experiment, rats induced steatosis (from stage 0/1 after 4 weeks to stage 2/3 after 20 weeks), inflammation (from stage 0/1 after 4 weeks to stage 1/2 after 20 weeks), and fibrosis (from stage 1 after 12 weeks to stage 2 after 20 weeks). CONCLUSION: We can assume that the presented model based on the HFHCh diet induced gradual development of NAFLD. We confirmed that the animal NAFLD model increases LPS secretions during disease progression. PMID: 31783667 [PubMed]

Ammonium Fluoride as Suitable Additive for HILIC-Based LC-HRMS Metabolomics.

Sun, 01/12/2019 - 14:25
Related Articles Ammonium Fluoride as Suitable Additive for HILIC-Based LC-HRMS Metabolomics. Metabolites. 2019 Nov 27;9(12): Authors: Narduzzi L, Royer AL, Bichon E, Guitton Y, Buisson C, Le Bizec B, Dervilly-Pinel G Abstract Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography (HILIC) chromatography is widely applied in metabolomics as a complementary strategy to reverse phase chromatography. Nevertheless, it still faces several issues in terms of peak shape and compounds ionization, limiting the automatic de-convolution and data semi-quantification performed through dedicated software. A way to improve the chromatographic and ionization performance of a HILIC method is to modify the electrostatic interactions of the analytes with both mobile and stationary phases. In this study, using a ZIC-HILIC chromatographic phase, we evaluated the performance of ammonium fluoride (AF) as additive salt, comparing its performance to ammonium acetate (AA). Three comparative criteria were selected: (1) identification and peak quality of 34 standards following a metabolomics-specific evaluation approach, (2) an intraday repeatability test with real samples and (3) performing two real metabolomics fingerprints with the AF method to evaluate its inter-day repeatability. The AF method showed not only higher ionization efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio but also better repeatability and robustness than the AA approach. A tips and tricks section is then added, aiming at improving method replicability for further users. In conclusion, ammonium fluoride as additive salt presents several advantages and might be considered as a step forward in the application of robust HILIC methods in metabolomics. PMID: 31783638 [PubMed]

Mucosal Metabolomic Profiling and Pathway Analysis Reveal the Metabolic Signature of Ulcerative Colitis.

Sun, 01/12/2019 - 14:25
Related Articles Mucosal Metabolomic Profiling and Pathway Analysis Reveal the Metabolic Signature of Ulcerative Colitis. Metabolites. 2019 Nov 27;9(12): Authors: Diab J, Hansen T, Goll R, Stenlund H, Jensen E, Moritz T, Florholmen J, Forsdahl G Abstract The onset of ulcerative colitis (UC) is characterized by a dysregulated mucosal immune response triggered by several genetic and environmental factors in the context of host-microbe interaction. This complexity makes UC ideal for metabolomic studies to unravel the disease pathobiology and to improve the patient stratification strategies. This study aims to explore the mucosal metabolomic profile in UC patients, and to define the UC metabolic signature. Treatment- naïve UC patients (n = 18), UC patients in deep remission (n = 10), and healthy volunteers (n = 14) were recruited. Mucosa biopsies were collected during colonoscopies. Metabolomic analysis was performed by combined gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS). In total, 177 metabolites from 50 metabolic pathways were identified. The most prominent metabolome changes among the study groups were in lysophosphatidylcholine, acyl carnitine, and amino acid profiles. Several pathways were found perturbed according to the integrated pathway analysis. These pathways ranged from amino acid metabolism (such as tryptophan metabolism) to fatty acid metabolism, namely linoleic and butyrate. These metabolic changes during UC reflect the homeostatic disturbance in the gut, and highlight the importance of system biology approaches to identify key drivers of pathogenesis which prerequisite personalized medicine. PMID: 31783598 [PubMed]

Antioxidant defenses and metabolic responses of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) exposed to various concentrations of erythromycin.

Sun, 01/12/2019 - 14:25
Related Articles Antioxidant defenses and metabolic responses of blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) exposed to various concentrations of erythromycin. Sci Total Environ. 2020 Jan 01;698:134221 Authors: Liang R, Shao X, Shi Y, Jiang L, Han G Abstract Erythromycin, one of the most widely used macrolide antibiotics, has been detected in various aquatic environments, so erythromycin ecotoxicity should deserve more attention. In this study, blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) were exposed to erythromycin to explore its potential physiological toxicity. After 2d acute and 7d sub-acute exposure to erythromycin, blue mussel glutathione S-transferase (GST) and catalase (CAT) activities were determined with microplate methods and metabolic responses were analyzed using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR). The results revealed that GST was approximately 1.6 times higher in exposed mussels at 200 mg/L and higher concentrations. CAT was about 1.9 times higher in exposed mussels at 200 mg/L, indicating that erythromycin exposure led that blue mussels enhanced antioxidant responses. Low doses of erythromycin exposure had a relatively small impact on the metabolism, while high doses of erythromycin exposure (200 and 400 mg/L) disturbed metabolic balance. With the increase of erythromycin concentrations, the individual metabolic differences within the same treatment groups also increased. The significant increase in alanine, glutamate, taurine, glycine and betaine were observed after acute and subacute exposure. Betaine played an important role in protecting antioxidant enzyme activities through adjusting osmotic pressure. The metabolomic results also showed the modes of erythromycin acted on the energy metabolism, osmoregulation, nerve activities and amino acid metabolism. This study highlighted how metabolomics can provide a comprehensive picture of metabolic responses, although significant antioxidant and metabolic responses were observed at high exposure concentrations. PMID: 31783436 [PubMed - in process]

metabolomics; +59 new citations

Sat, 30/11/2019 - 14:22
59 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/11/30PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +17 new citations

Fri, 29/11/2019 - 23:16
17 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/11/29PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +19 new citations

Thu, 28/11/2019 - 14:07
19 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/11/28PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +25 new citations

Wed, 27/11/2019 - 13:51
25 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/11/27PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +31 new citations

Tue, 26/11/2019 - 16:46
31 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/11/26PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +31 new citations

Tue, 26/11/2019 - 13:46
31 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/11/26PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

Chronic exposure of soybean plants to nanomolar cadmium reveals specific additional high-affinity targets of Cd toxicity.

Mon, 25/11/2019 - 13:39
Related Articles Chronic exposure of soybean plants to nanomolar cadmium reveals specific additional high-affinity targets of Cd toxicity. J Exp Bot. 2019 Nov 24;: Authors: Andresen E, Lyubenova L, Hubáček T, Bokhari SNH, Matoušková Š, Mijovilovich A, Rohovec J, Küpper H Abstract Solving the global environmental and agricultural problem of chronic low-level Cd exposure requires better mechanistic understanding. Here, soybean (Glycine max) plants were exposed to Cd concentrations ranging from 0.5 nM (background concentration, control) to 3 µM. Plants were cultivated hydroponically under non-nodulating conditions for 10 weeks. Toxicity symptoms, net photosynthetic oxygen production, photosynthesis biophysics (Chl fluorescence: Kautsky and OJIP), Cd binding to proteins (metalloproteomics by HPLC-ICPMS) and Cd ligands in LHCII (XANES), accumulation of elements, Chl and metabolites were monitored. PMID: 31760430 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

[Shift work as a factor increasing the risk of civilization diseases - what's new in the old issue?]

Mon, 25/11/2019 - 13:39
Related Articles [Shift work as a factor increasing the risk of civilization diseases - what's new in the old issue?] Pol Merkur Lekarski. 2019 Oct 29;47(280):157-161 Authors: Wolska A, Sznabel D, Stachowska E Abstract People are more and more often taking up shift work, which in the long run may have harmful health effects. Whether a person working in a shift system gets sick is influenced by many external factors (rotation and type of changes and work performed, socio-psychological factors) and endogenous (sex, age, health and physiological status, individual, internal biological clock - chronotype, physiological tolerance work at night). Many authors in their work prove that work in a rotational rotation system affects the occurrence of various types of cancer, hormone production, occurrence of metabolic disorders and civilization diseases (type II diabetes, insulin resistance, overweight and obesity, hypertension and coronary heart disease), microflora differentiation intestinal and contributes to increased stress of the body. In addition, the time in which a person works has a direct impact on the consumption and quality of meals. Shift workers often do not have time to eat regular, properly balanced meals that would satisfy their energy and nutritional needs. For this reason, most often reach for ready-to-eat foods that are characterized by low nutritional value at a relatively high energy value. Shift work also carries a risk of circadian rhythm disturbances and sleep disorders. Many studies indicate that there is an increased risk of some types of cancer and civilization diseases, but there is no clear evidence as to whether this is only the fault of rotary night work. PMID: 31760400 [PubMed - in process]

α-Linolenic acid-enriched butter attenuated high fat diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammation by promoting bioconversion of n-3 PUFA and subsequent oxylipin formation.

Mon, 25/11/2019 - 13:39
Related Articles α-Linolenic acid-enriched butter attenuated high fat diet-induced insulin resistance and inflammation by promoting bioconversion of n-3 PUFA and subsequent oxylipin formation. J Nutr Biochem. 2019 Nov 12;76:108285 Authors: Fan R, Kim J, You M, Giraud D, Toney AM, Shin SH, Kim SY, Borkowski K, Newman JW, Chung S Abstract α-Linolenic acid (ALA) is an essential fatty acid and the precursor for long-chain n-3 PUFA. However, biosynthesis of n-3 PUFA is limited in a Western diet likely due to an overabundance of n-6 PUFA. We hypothesized that dietary reduction of n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio is sufficient to promote the biosynthesis of long-chain n-3 PUFA, leading to an attenuation of high fat (HF) diet-induced obesity and inflammation. C57BL/6 J mice were fed a HF diet from ALA-enriched butter (n3Bu, n-6/n-3=1) in comparison with isocaloric HF diets from either conventional butter lacking both ALA and LA (Bu, n-6/n-3=6), or margarine containing a similar amount of ALA and abundant LA (Ma, n-6/n-3=6). Targeted lipidomic analyses revealed that n3Bu feeding promoted the bioconversion of long-chain n-3 PUFA and their oxygenated metabolites (oxylipins) derived from ALA and EPA. The n3Bu supplementation attenuated hepatic TG accumulation and adipose tissue inflammation, resulting in improved insulin sensitivity. Decreased inflammation by n3Bu feeding was attributed to the suppression of NF-κB activation and M1 macrophage polarization. Collectively, our work suggests that dietary reduction of the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio, as well as total n-3 PUFA consumed, is a crucial determinant that facilitates n-3 PUFA biosynthesis and subsequent lipidomic modifications, thereby conferring metabolic benefits against obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance. PMID: 31760228 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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