Integrative Molecular Phenotyping
INTEGRATIVE MOLECULAR
PHENOTYPING
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY

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Is science loosing its way??

The rage over reproducibility in science continues.  I must admit that I find myself perplexed that this has even become an issue.  To me it seems completely and utterly natural that science requires replication.  The field of discovery and inquiry demands replication.  A single discovery, while exciting, is only that - a single report.  If you believe in your science - and your findings, would you not welcome replicaiton?  If your findings are replicated - then the field will continue to move forward.  If your findings are not replicated - then everyone has to take a step back and figure out what happened.  Of course the real problem here is the issue of how we publish our research.  The constant push to publish new findings makes the science of replication unglamorous at best - and top journals are certainly not interested in publishing these studies. The journals' push to make our Methods sections as short as possible - or even shoved to the oblivion of Supplemental Material - certainly exascerbates this problem.  What could be more important than a detailed presentation of the exact methods used to produce the published result?  Yet academic publishing considers the Methods to be almost irrelevant to the paper.  It is past time for scientists to demand a better model.  We want to be left alone to do perform our science, but we cannot ignore what is happening in the field.  Publishing needs a new paradigm - and it is up to scientists to make it happen.

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