Integrative Molecular Phenotyping
INTEGRATIVE MOLECULAR
PHENOTYPING
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY
DEPARTMENT OF MEDICAL
BIOCHEMISTRY AND BIOPHYSICS
WHEELOCK LABORATORY

PubMed

PubMed
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=metabolomics
Updated: 2 hours 56 min ago

Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like proteins: phylogenetic relationships, stage-specific transcription and tissue localization as predictors of immunological cross-reactivity.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like proteins: phylogenetic relationships, stage-specific transcription and tissue localization as predictors of immunological cross-reactivity. Int J Parasitol. 2019 May 25;: Authors: Farias LP, Chalmers IW, Perally S, Rofatto HK, Jackson CJ, Brown M, Khouri MI, Barbosa MMF, Hensbergen PJ, Hokke CH, Leite LCC, Hoffmann KF Abstract Schistosoma mansoni venom allergen-like proteins (SmVALs) are part of a diverse protein superfamily partitioned into two groups (group 1 and group 2). Phylogenetic analyses of group 1 SmVALs revealed that members could be segregated into subclades (A-D); these subclades share similar gene expression patterns across the parasite lifecycle and immunological cross-reactivity. Furthermore, whole-mount in situ hybridization demonstrated that the phylogenetically, transcriptionally and immunologically-related SmVAL4, 10, 18 and 19 (subclade C) were all localized to the pre-acetabular glands of immature cercariae. Our results suggest that SmVAL group 1 phylogenetic relationships, stage-specific transcriptional profiles and tissue localization are predictive of immunological cross-reactivity. PMID: 31136745 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Decreased plasma serotonin and other metabolite changes in healthy adults after consumption of wholegrain rye: an untargeted metabolomics study.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles Decreased plasma serotonin and other metabolite changes in healthy adults after consumption of wholegrain rye: an untargeted metabolomics study. Am J Clin Nutr. 2019 Jun 01;109(6):1630-1639 Authors: Keski-Rahkonen P, Kolehmainen M, Lappi J, Micard V, Jokkala J, Rosa-Sibakov N, Pihlajamäki J, Kirjavainen PV, Mykkänen H, Poutanen K, Gunter MJ, Scalbert A, Hanhineva K Abstract BACKGROUND: Wholegrain consumption has been associated with beneficial health effects including reduction of diabetes and cancer risk; however, the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to characterize the effects of wholegrain rye intake on circulating metabolites in a human intervention study using untargeted metabolomics. METHODS: The intervention consisted of 2 successive 4-wk periods in a randomized crossover design, where 15 adults consumed wholegrain rye bread (WGR) or white wheat bread enriched with fermented rye bran (WW+RB), following a 4-wk rye-free period with white wheat bread (WW). Fasting plasma samples were collected at the end of each period and analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Metabolic profiles were compared to identify compounds discriminating WGR from the WW+RB and WW periods. Because peripheral serotonin is produced mainly in the gut, a hypothesis of its altered biosynthesis as a response to increased cereal fiber intake was tested by measuring intestinal serotonin of mice fed for 9 wk on a high-fat diet supplemented with different sources of fiber (rye bran flour, ground wheat aleurone, or powdered cellulose). RESULTS: Five endogenous metabolites and 15 rye phytochemicals associated with WGR intake were identified. Plasma concentrations of serotonin, taurine, and glycerophosphocholine were significantly lower after the WGR than WW period (Q < 0.05). Concentrations of 2 phosphatidylethanolamine plasmalogens, PE(18:2/P-18:0) and PE(18:2/P-16:0), were lower after the WGR period than the WW+RB period (Q < 0.05). The concentration of serotonin was significantly lower in the colonic tissue of mice that consumed rye bran or wheat aleurone compared with cellulose (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Wholegrain rye intake decreases plasma serotonin in healthy adults when compared with refined wheat. Intake of rye bran and wheat aleurone decreases colonic serotonin in mice. These results suggest that peripheral serotonin could be a potential link between wholegrain consumption and its associated health effects.Data used in the study were derived from a trial registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT03550365. PMID: 31136658 [PubMed - in process]

Transcriptomic and Metabolomic Profiling of Camellia sinensis L. cv. 'Suchazao' Exposed to Temperature Stresses Reveals Modification in Protein Synthesis and Photosynthetic and Anthocyanin Biosynthetic Pathways.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles Transcriptomic and Metabolomic Profiling of Camellia sinensis L. cv. 'Suchazao' Exposed to Temperature Stresses Reveals Modification in Protein Synthesis and Photosynthetic and Anthocyanin Biosynthetic Pathways. Tree Physiol. 2019 May 28;: Authors: Shen J, Zhang D, Zhou L, Zhang X, Liao J, Duan Y, Wen B, Ma Y, Wang Y, Fang W, Zhu X Abstract To determine the mechanisms in tea plants responding to temperature stresses (heat and cold), we examined the global transcriptomic and metabolomic profiles of the tea plant cultivar 'Suchazao' under moderately low temperature (ML), severely low temperature (SL), moderately high temperature (MH), and severely high temperature (SH) using RNA-Seq and HPLC-MS/MS, respectively. The identified differentially expressed genes indicated that the synthesis of stress-resistance protein might be redirected to cope with the temperature stresses. We found that heat shock protein genes Hsp90 and Hsp70 played more critical roles in tea plants in adapting to thermal stress than cold, while LEA played a greater role under cold than heat stress, more types of zinc finger genes were induced under cold stress as well. In addition, energy metabolisms were inhibited by SH, SL, and ML. Furthermore, the mechanisms of anthocyanin synthesis were different under the cold and heat stresses. Indeed, the CsUGT75C1gene, encoding UDP-glucose: anthocyanin 5-O-glucosyl transferase, was up-regulated in the SL-treated leaves but down-regulated in SH. Metabolomics analysis also showed that anthocyanin monomer levels increased under SL. These results indicate that the tea plants share certain foundational mechanisms to adjust to both cold and heat stresses. They also developed some specific mechanisms for surviving the cold or heat stresses. Our study provides effective information about the different mechanisms tea plants employing in surviving cold and heat stresses, as well as the different mechanisms of anthocyanin synthesis, which could speed up the genetic breeding of heat- and cold-tolerant tea varieties. PMID: 31135909 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Association of Nonfasting vs Fasting Lipid Levels With Risk of Major Coronary Events in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Lipid Lowering Arm.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles Association of Nonfasting vs Fasting Lipid Levels With Risk of Major Coronary Events in the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Lipid Lowering Arm. JAMA Intern Med. 2019 May 28;: Authors: Mora S, Chang CL, Moorthy MV, Sever PS Abstract Importance: Recent guidelines have recommended nonfasting for routine testing of lipid levels based on comparisons of nonfasting and fasting populations. However, no previous study has examined the association of cardiovascular outcomes with fasting vs nonfasting lipid levels measured in the same individuals. Objective: To compare the association of nonfasting and fasting lipid levels with prospectively ascertained coronary and vascular outcomes and to evaluate whether a strategy of using nonfasting instead of fasting lipid level measurement would result in misclassification of risk for individuals undergoing evaluation for initiation of statin therapy. Design, Setting, and Participants: This post hoc prospective follow-up of a randomized clinical trial included 8270 of 10 305 participants from the Anglo-Scandinavian Cardiac Outcomes Trial-Lipid Lowering Arm (ASCOT-LLA) with nonfasting and fasting lipid levels measured 4 weeks apart (including 6855 participants with no prior vascular disease) (median follow-up, 3.3 years; interquartile range, 2.8-3.6 years). Data were collected from February 1, 1998, to December 31, 2002, and analyzed from February 1, 2016, to November 30, 2018. Multivariable Cox models, adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors, were calculated for 40-mg/dL (1-mmol/L) higher values of nonfasting and fasting lipids. Main Outcomes and Measures: The trial's primary end point consisted of major coronary events (nonfatal myocardial infarction [MI] and fatal coronary heart disease [212 events]). Secondary analyses examined atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) events (including MI, stroke, and ASCVD death [351 events]). Results: Among the 8270 participants (82.1% male; mean [SD] age, 63.4 [8.5] years), nonfasting samples had modestly higher triglyceride levels and similar cholesterol levels compared to fasting samples. Associations of nonfasting lipid levels with coronary events were similar to those for fasting lipid levels. For example, adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) per 40-mg/dL of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were 1.32 (95% CI, 1.08-1.61; P = .007) for nonfasting levels and 1.28 (95% CI, 1.07-1.55; P = .008) for fasting levels. For the primary prevention group, adjusted HRs were 1.42 (95% CI, 1.13-1.78; P = .003) for nonfasting levels and 1.37 (95% CI, 1.11-1.69; P = .003) for fasting levels. Results were consistent by randomized treatment arm (atorvastatin calcium, 10 mg/d, or placebo) and similar for ASCVD events. Concordance of fasting and nonfasting lipid levels for classifying participants into appropriate ASCVD risk categories was high (94.8%). Conclusions and Relevance: Measurement of nonfasting and fasting lipid levels yields similar results in the same individuals for association with incident coronary and ASCVD events. These results suggest that routine measurement of nonfasting lipid levels may help facilitate ASCVD risk screening and treatment, including consideration of when to initiate statin therapy. PMID: 31135812 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

A robust intracellular metabolite extraction protocol for human neutrophil metabolic profiling.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles A robust intracellular metabolite extraction protocol for human neutrophil metabolic profiling. PLoS One. 2018;13(12):e0209270 Authors: Chokesuwattanaskul S, Phelan MM, Edwards SW, Wright HL Abstract Neutrophils are phagocytic innate immune cells that play essential roles in host defence, but are also implicated in inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) where they contribute to systemic inflammation and joint damage. Transcriptomic analysis of neutrophils has revealed significant changes in gene expression in neutrophils activated in vitro by cytokines and in vivo during inflammation in RA. However, there are no reports on the global metabolomic changes that occur as a consequence of this activation. The aim of this study was to establish protocols for the study of changes in the metabolome of human neutrophils using 1H NMR spectroscopy. Sample preparation and spectral analysis protocols were optimised using neutrophils isolated by Ficoll-Paque, with decreased washing steps and inclusion of a heat-shock step to quench metabolite turnover. Cells were incubated ± PMA for 15 min in HEPES-free media and samples were analysed by NMR using a 700 MHz NMR Avance IIIHD Bruker NMR spectrometer equipped with a TCI cryoprobe. Chenomx, Bruker TopSpin and AMIX software were used to process spectra and identify metabolites. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and signalling pathway analysis was carried out using Metaboanalyst. Cell number and number of scans (NS) were optimised as >3.6 million cells and 512 NS. 327 spectral bins were defined in the neutrophil spectra, of which 287 (87.7%) were assigned to 110 metabolites that included: amino acids, peptides and analogues; carbohydrates, carbonyls and alcohols; nucleotides, nucleosides and analogues; lipids and lipid-like molecules; benzenoids; and other organic compounds. 43 metabolites changed at least 1.5 fold (increase or decrease) after the addition of PMA for 5 or 15 min. Pathway analysis revealed that PMA affected nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, aminoacyl-tRNA biosynthesis and glycolysis, suggesting a redirection of glucose metabolism from glycolysis to the pentose phosphate pathway and production of NADPH for activation of the NADPH oxidase and subsequent respiratory burst. We have developed protocols for the study of human neutrophils by 1H NMR spectroscopy. Importantly, this methodology has sufficient sensitivity and reproducibility to detect changes in metabolite abundance from cell numbers typically collected from clinical samples or experiments with multiple assay conditions. PMID: 30571714 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Dual cationic-anionic profiling of metabolites in a single identified cell in a live Xenopus laevis embryo by microprobe CE-ESI-MS.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles Dual cationic-anionic profiling of metabolites in a single identified cell in a live Xenopus laevis embryo by microprobe CE-ESI-MS. Analyst. 2019 Jan 28;144(3):892-900 Authors: Portero EP, Nemes P Abstract In situ capillary microsampling with capillary electrophoresis (CE) electrospray ionization (ESI) mass spectrometry (MS) enabled the characterization of cationic metabolites in single cells in complex tissues and organisms. For deeper coverage of the metabolome and metabolic networks, analytical approaches are needed that provide complementary detection for anionic metabolites, ideally using the same instrumentation. Described here is one such approach that enables sequential cationic and anionic (dual) analysis of metabolites in the same identified cell in a live vertebrate embryo. A calibrated volume was microaspirated from the animal-ventral cell in a live 8-cell embryo of Xenopus laevis, and cationic and anionic metabolites were one-pot microextracted from the aspirate, followed by CE-ESI-MS analysis of the same extract. A laboratory-built CE-ESI interface was reconfigured to enable dual cationic-anionic analysis with ∼5-10 nM (50-100 amol) lower limit of detection and a capability for quantification. To provide robust separation and efficient ion generation, the CE-ESI interface was enclosed in a nitrogen gas filled chamber, and the operational parameters were optimized for the cone-jet spraying regime in both the positive and negative ion mode. A total of ∼250 cationic and ∼200 anionic molecular features were detected from the cell between m/z 50-550, including 60 and 24 identified metabolites, respectively. With only 11 metabolites identified mutually, the duplexed approach yielded complementary information on metabolites produced in the cell, which in turn deepened network coverage for several metabolic pathways. With scalability to smaller cells and adaptability to other types of tissues and organisms, dual cationic-anionic detection with in situ microprobe CE-ESI-MS opens a door to better understand cell metabolism. PMID: 30542678 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Recent advances in single-cell analysis by mass spectrometry.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles Recent advances in single-cell analysis by mass spectrometry. Analyst. 2019 Jan 28;144(3):824-845 Authors: Yin L, Zhang Z, Liu Y, Gao Y, Gu J Abstract Cells are the most basic structural units that play vital roles in the functioning of living organisms. Analysis of the chemical composition and content of a single cell plays a vital role in ensuring precise investigations of cellular metabolism, and is a crucial aspect of lipidomic and proteomic studies. In addition, structural knowledge provides a better understanding of cell behavior as well as the cellular and subcellular mechanisms. However, single-cell analysis can be very challenging due to the very small size of each cell as well as the large variety and extremely low concentrations of substances found in individual cells. On account of its high sensitivity and selectivity, mass spectrometry holds great promise as an effective technique for single-cell analysis. Numerous mass spectrometric techniques have been developed to elucidate the molecular profiles at the cellular level, including electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), laser-based mass spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). In this review, the recent advances in single-cell analysis by mass spectrometry are summarized. The strategies of different ionization modes to achieve single-cell analysis are classified and discussed in detail. PMID: 30334031 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Anaerobic nitrate reduction divergently governs population expansion of the enteropathogen Vibrio cholerae.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles Anaerobic nitrate reduction divergently governs population expansion of the enteropathogen Vibrio cholerae. Nat Microbiol. 2018 12;3(12):1346-1353 Authors: Bueno E, Sit B, Waldor MK, Cava F Abstract To survive and proliferate in the absence of oxygen, many enteric pathogens can undergo anaerobic respiration within the host by using nitrate (NO3-) as an electron acceptor1,2. In these bacteria, NO3- is typically reduced by a nitrate reductase to nitrite (NO2-), a toxic intermediate that is further reduced by a nitrite reductase3. However, Vibrio cholerae, the intestinal pathogen that causes cholera, lacks a nitrite reductase, leading to NO2- accumulation during nitrate reduction4. Thus, V. cholerae is thought to be unable to undergo NO3--dependent anaerobic respiration4. Here, we show that during hypoxic growth, NO3- reduction in V. cholerae divergently affects bacterial fitness in a manner dependent on environmental pH. Remarkably, in alkaline conditions, V. cholerae can reduce NO3- to support population growth. Conversely, in acidic conditions, accumulation of NO2- from NO3- reduction simultaneously limits population expansion and preserves cell viability by lowering fermentative acid production. Interestingly, other bacterial species such as Salmonella typhimurium, enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) and Citrobacter rodentium also reproduced this pH-dependent response, suggesting that this mechanism might be conserved within enteric pathogens. Our findings explain how a bacterial pathogen can use a single redox reaction to divergently regulate population expansion depending on the fluctuating environmental pH. PMID: 30275512 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Lipidomics for translational skin research: A primer for the uninitiated.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles Lipidomics for translational skin research: A primer for the uninitiated. Exp Dermatol. 2018 07;27(7):721-728 Authors: Kendall AC, Koszyczarek MM, Jones EA, Hart PJ, Towers M, Griffiths CEM, Morris M, Nicolaou A Abstract Healthy skin depends on a unique lipid profile to form a barrier that confers protection and prevents excessive water loss, aids cell-cell communication and regulates cutaneous homoeostasis and inflammation. Alterations in the cutaneous lipid profile can have severe consequences for skin health and have been implicated in numerous inflammatory skin conditions. Thus, skin lipidomics is increasingly of interest, and recent developments in mass spectrometry-based analytical technologies can deliver in-depth investigation of cutaneous lipids, providing insight into their role and mechanism of action. The choice of tissue sampling technique and analytical approach depends on the location and chemistry of the lipid of interest. Lipidomics can be conducted by various mass spectrometry approaches, including different chromatography and ionisation techniques. Targeted mass spectrometry is a sensitive approach for measuring low-abundance signalling lipids, such as eicosanoids, endocannabinoids and ceramides. This approach requires specific extraction, chromatography and mass spectrometry protocols to quantitate the lipid targets. Untargeted mass spectrometry reveals global changes and allows analysis of hundreds of complex lipids across a range of lipid classes, including phospholipids, glycerophospholipids, cholesteryl esters and sphingolipids. Mass spectrometry lipid imaging, including matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation mass spectrometry and desorption electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry, can reveal information about abundance and anatomical distribution of lipids within a single skin sample. Skin lipidomics can provide qualitative and quantitative data on hundreds of biologically relevant lipid species with different properties and activities, all found within a single skin sample, and support translational studies exploring the involvement of lipids in skin health and disease. PMID: 29654617 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Dysregulation of methionine metabolism in multiple sclerosis.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles Dysregulation of methionine metabolism in multiple sclerosis. Neurochem Int. 2018 01;112:1-4 Authors: Singhal NK, Freeman E, Arning E, Wasek B, Clements R, Sheppard C, Blake P, Bottiglieri T, McDonough J Abstract We report a significant reduction in plasma methionine concentrations in relapse remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) patients compared to controls. In vivo studies demonstrate that changes in peripheral methionine levels in mice can regulate histone H3 methylation and expression of DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A) centrally, in the cerebral cortex. Therefore, we propose that decreases in circulating methionine represent one of the earliest manifestations of dysregulated methionine metabolism in MS with potential impacts on both histone H3 and DNA methylation in the central nervous system. PMID: 29080803 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

An automated ranking platform for machine learning regression models for meat spoilage prediction using multi-spectral imaging and metabolic profiling.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles An automated ranking platform for machine learning regression models for meat spoilage prediction using multi-spectral imaging and metabolic profiling. Food Res Int. 2017 09;99(Pt 1):206-215 Authors: Estelles-Lopez L, Ropodi A, Pavlidis D, Fotopoulou J, Gkousari C, Peyrodie A, Panagou E, Nychas GJ, Mohareb F Abstract Over the past decade, analytical approaches based on vibrational spectroscopy, hyperspectral/multispectral imagining and biomimetic sensors started gaining popularity as rapid and efficient methods for assessing food quality, safety and authentication; as a sensible alternative to the expensive and time-consuming conventional microbiological techniques. Due to the multi-dimensional nature of the data generated from such analyses, the output needs to be coupled with a suitable statistical approach or machine-learning algorithms before the results can be interpreted. Choosing the optimum pattern recognition or machine learning approach for a given analytical platform is often challenging and involves a comparative analysis between various algorithms in order to achieve the best possible prediction accuracy. In this work, "MeatReg", a web-based application is presented, able to automate the procedure of identifying the best machine learning method for comparing data from several analytical techniques, to predict the counts of microorganisms responsible of meat spoilage regardless of the packaging system applied. In particularly up to 7 regression methods were applied and these are ordinary least squares regression, stepwise linear regression, partial least square regression, principal component regression, support vector regression, random forest and k-nearest neighbours. MeatReg" was tested with minced beef samples stored under aerobic and modified atmosphere packaging and analysed with electronic nose, HPLC, FT-IR, GC-MS and Multispectral imaging instrument. Population of total viable count, lactic acid bacteria, pseudomonads, Enterobacteriaceae and B. thermosphacta, were predicted. As a result, recommendations of which analytical platforms are suitable to predict each type of bacteria and which machine learning methods to use in each case were obtained. The developed system is accessible via the link: www.sorfml.com. PMID: 28784477 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

UHPLC-PDA-ESI-TOF/MS metabolic profiling and antioxidant capacity of arabica and robusta coffee silverskin: Antioxidants vs phytotoxins.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles UHPLC-PDA-ESI-TOF/MS metabolic profiling and antioxidant capacity of arabica and robusta coffee silverskin: Antioxidants vs phytotoxins. Food Res Int. 2017 09;99(Pt 1):155-165 Authors: Panusa A, Petrucci R, Lavecchia R, Zuorro A Abstract A deeper knowledge of the chemical composition of coffee silverskin (CS) is needed due to the growing interest in its use as a food additive or an ingredient of dietary supplements. Accordingly, the aim of this paper was to investigate the metabolic profile of aqueous extracts of two varieties of CS, Coffee arabica (CS-A), Coffee canephora var. robusta (CS-R) and of a blend of the two (CS-b) and to compare it to the profile of Coffee arabica green coffee (GC). Chlorogenic acids, caffeine, furokauranes, and atractyligenins, phytotoxins not previously detected in CS, were either identified or tentatively assigned. An unknown compound, presumably a carboxyatractyligenin glycoside was detected only in GC. Caffeine and chlorogenic acids were quantified while the content of furokauranes and atractyligens was estimated. GC and CS were also characterized in terms of total polyphenols and antioxidant capacity. Differences in the metabolites distribution, polyphenols and antioxidant capacity in GC and CS were detailed. PMID: 28784472 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Markers of Inflammation and Incident Breast Cancer Risk in the Women's Health Study.

Wed, 29/05/2019 - 13:19
Related Articles Markers of Inflammation and Incident Breast Cancer Risk in the Women's Health Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2018 04 01;187(4):705-716 Authors: Tobias DK, Akinkuolie AO, Chandler PD, Lawler PR, Manson JE, Buring JE, Ridker PM, Wang L, Lee IM, Mora S Abstract Chronic inflammation may be a risk factor for the development and progression of breast cancer, yet it is unknown which inflammatory biomarkers and pathways are especially relevant. The present study included 27,071 participants (mean age = 54.5 years) in the Women's Health Study who were free of cancer and cardiovascular disease at enrollment (1992-1995), with baseline measures of 4 inflammatory biomarkers: high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, N-acetyl side-chains of acute phase proteins, and soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1. We used Cox proportional hazards regression models to evaluate associations between baseline concentrations of biomarkers and incident breast cancer, and adjusted for baseline and time-varying factors such as age and body mass index. Self-reported invasive breast cancer was confirmed against medical records for 1,497 incident cases (90% postmenopausal). We observed different patterns of risk depending on the inflammatory biomarker. There was a significant direct association between fibrinogen and breast cancer risk (for quintile 5 vs. quintile 1, adjusted hazard ratio = 1.25, 95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.51; P for trend = 0.01). In contrast, soluble intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was inversely associated with breast cancer (for quintile 5 vs. quintile 1, adjusted hazard ratio = 0.79, 95% confidence interval: 0.66, 0.94; P for trend = 0.02). N-acetyl side-chains of acute phase proteins and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were not associated with breast cancer. The complex association of chronic inflammation and breast cancer may be considered when formulating anti-inflammatory cancer prevention or intervention strategies. PMID: 28641369 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

metabolomics; +71 new citations

Tue, 28/05/2019 - 22:15
71 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/05/28PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +44 new citations

Fri, 24/05/2019 - 15:12
44 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/05/24PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +44 new citations

Fri, 24/05/2019 - 12:10
44 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/05/24PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +23 new citations

Thu, 23/05/2019 - 14:51
23 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/05/23PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +33 new citations

Wed, 22/05/2019 - 17:44
33 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/05/22PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +33 new citations

Wed, 22/05/2019 - 14:36
33 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/05/22PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

metabolomics; +26 new citations

Tue, 21/05/2019 - 14:20
26 new pubmed citations were retrieved for your search. Click on the search hyperlink below to display the complete search results: metabolomics These pubmed results were generated on 2019/05/21PubMed comprises more than millions of citations for biomedical literature from MEDLINE, life science journals, and online books. Citations may include links to full-text content from PubMed Central and publisher web sites.

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